Mipso

Mipso

Jason Scott

Thu. October 11, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$12.00 - $15.00

This event is 21 and over

Mipso
Mipso
Chapel Hill’s indie Americana quartet Mipso – Jacob Sharp (mandolin, vocals), Wood Robinson (bass, vocals), Joseph Terrell (guitar, vocals), and Libby Rodenbough (fiddle, vocals) – release their fifth album, Edges Run, on April 6th, 2018 via a newly inked record deal with AntiFragile Music. Influenced by the contradiction of its progressive home and the surrounding rural southern landscapes, Mipso has been hailed as “hewing surprisingly close to gospel and folk while still sounding modern and secular”(Acoustic Guitar) and was recently recognized by Rolling Stone as an “ Artist You Need to Know.” The band brings a distinctly unique sound – full of wistful beauty, hopeful undercurrents, and panoramic soundscapes. Venturing ever-further from its string-band pedigree to discover a broader Americana where classic folk-rock and modern alt-country sounds mingle easily with Appalachian tradition, Mipso’s music is lush and forward moving, with lyrics that sear and salve in turn. Look for Mipso on tour this spring in support of their new release, Edges Run. www.mipsomusic.com
Since then, Mipso has performed over 300 shows and welcomed frequent collaborator Libby Rodenbough's voice and fiddle to the fold – and has continued to grow as musicians and songwriters, while drawing continual inspiration from their rich North Carolina roots. Their new album, Old Time Reverie – produced by Man dolin Orange's Andrew Marlin – is a reflection of that musical and personal growth: a gripping, mature sophomore release that finds the quartet expanding their sonic resources while doubling down on their experimentation with string band tradition.

While the instrumentation on the acclaimed Dark Holler Pop embraced North Carolina's bluegrass heritage head-on, Old Time Reverie finds Mipso shifting their focus away from bluegrass, introducing new instruments and textures to create a distinctly different sound. Clawhammer banjo out of 1920s early country music meets atmospheric electric organ (played by Josh Oliver of The Everybodyfields) more native to 1970s pop. Add imaginative songwriting and a group cohesion gained from two years of near-constant touring, and the resulting sound is powerfully rhythmic, lyrically sharp, and woven with beautiful four-part harmonies.

Before forming Mipso, Jacob Sharp (mandolin), Joseph Terrell (guitar), Wood Robinson (bass), and Libby Rodenbough (fiddle) were just classmates at UNC-Chapel Hill, where the experience of singing together in harmony drew them together. The sound of their blended voices remains one of the band's hallmarks. Since those college jam sessions, the four have entered a new phase of life, one where the work of making music – and the work of living – has become a more complicated affair. Many of the songs on Old Time Reverie grapple with the moral ambiguity that comes with keeping hope in a difficult world and making sense of its contradictions.

These songs, after all, were born in the South and reflect its modern day complexity. "Our progressive college town shares a county with lots of old tobacco barns and farms and churches from the eighteenth century," guitarist Joseph Terrell said. "We've chosen to stick around in this place where we're rooted, to reckon with and learn from its contradictions."

At times, the task seems doomed: "Everyone Knows" grapples with a world that is essentially "cold and dark," "Mama" explores the enduring scars of loss; "Marianne" follows an interracial couple's struggle to love one another against their community's disapproval. But if Old Time Reverie conjures a dark vision of the world, it also meditates on points of radiance. Even the wary narrator in "Father's House" can see "a light on the porch." The album closer "Four Train," too, is a crinkled smile at the end of a weary day, describing love as "like a stain that won't come out" or "like a flame that won't burn out" – or perhaps as both.

In both theme and temperament, the album finds an interplay between the sunrise and the twilight – a tug-of-war that's itself an old-time tradition. From "Eliza," a lively waltz-time romp, to "Bad Penny," a surrealist dream sequence with an Abe Lincoln cameo, the album revels in the seesaw spectrum of experience and memory, where technicolor carnival hues blend with grown-up sadness and the whispers of ghosts. Mipso's color palette, like its soundscape, is radically inclusive.

"We come from a place where traditional music is a living, changing thing," fiddle player Libby Rodenbough said. "So we feel like having an ear for all kinds of stuff is not only true to ourselves, it's a nod to the tradition." Call it what you will – to listen is to understand: it's either unlike anything you've heard before or effortlessly familiar. By digging deeper and expanding further, Mipso have created their own dark daydream of Southern Americana: Their Old Time Reverie.
Jason Scott
Jason Scott
Americana artist Jason Scott was raised in the land of boots, bolo ties, and burial grounds; bred on the Bible and shielded from most secular entertainment. His seemingly distant memory of that Oklahoma City childhood is a mosaic of tattered song books, equal parts fire and brimstone, and sneaking off to his uncle’s ‘79 Ford Bronco to listen to Conway Twitty tapes. Back then, an outside observer might have predicted Scott would grow up to be a preacher. But, Scott himself knew better: he was meant to make music, and a lot of it.



Scott, now 33, has an enviable knack for earworm melodies that wrap warmly around his life-pondering lyrics. He’s a skilled multi-instrumentalist quickly becoming known for his unrelenting, sweat-soaked performances. Scott is a producer, an engineer, and an in-demand session musician who in 2018 produced albums for Americana artists Carter Sampson, Ken Pomeroy, and Nellie Clay. In 2017 he co-produced his own 5-song debut EP Living Rooms with fellow Americana Okie Travis Linville. Scott is currently on tour with his fiery four-piece band delivering songs from Living Rooms and showcasing new material that will be on his long awaited first full-length album to be released in 2019. Scott self-released Living Rooms on his personal ON studios label and does most of his recording at ON studios, the home workspace he built. It’s pronounced “Owen” studios, named after the eldest of Scott’s two sons.

He is a member of the Americana Music Association and a BMI-licensed writer.



Scott recently earned a global tip of the hat from NPR Music when they spotlighted his song “She Good To Me” on World Cafe’s Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can’t Stop Playing alongside cuts by MGMT, Moby, and Jade Bird. The breezy mandolin-and-brushes gem is a tribute to Scott’s wife of nine years and is part of the Living Rooms EP.





Scott’s brag-worthy band features legendary Oklahoma percussionist Michael Byars, Kangwa Mundende on stand-up and bass guitar, and guitarist Gabriel Mor.



Living Rooms is available now on vinyl and CD at JasonScottMedia.com, Apple, Amazon, and Spotify. Please visit JasonScottMedia.com and follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
Venue Information:
Barleycorn's
608 E. Douglas Ave
Wichita, KS, 67202
http://barleycornswichita.com/